Informality in latin america and the caribbean
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Informality in latin america and the caribbean

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Published by World Bank in [Washington, D.C .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Economics -- Latin America

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementNorman V. Loayza, Luis Serven, Naotaka Sugawara.
SeriesPolicy research working paper -- 4888, Policy research working papers (Online) -- 4888.
ContributionsServen, Luis., Sugawara, Naotaka., World Bank.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHG3881.5.W57
The Physical Object
FormatElectronic resource
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL23226634M
LC Control Number2009655548

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  'Informality: Exit and Exclusion' analyzes informality in Latin America, exploring root causes and reasons for and implications of its growth. The authors use two distinct but complementary lenses: informality driven by 'exclusion'' from state benefits or the circuits of the modern economy, and driven by voluntary 'exit' decisions resulting from private cost-benefit calculations that lead Cited by:   This paper studies the causes and consequences of informality and applies the analysis to countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. It starts with a discussion on the definition and measures of informality, as well as on the reasons why widespread informality should be Cited by: Get this from a library! Informality in Latin America and the Caribbean. [Norman Loayza; Luis Serven; Naotaka Sugawara; World Bank.] -- "This paper studies the causes and consequences of informality and applies the analysis to countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. It starts with a discussion on the definition and measures of. Fiscal Consolidations and Informality in Latin America and the Caribbean. Thibault Lemaire. 1. April , WP # A. BSTRACT. The transmission mechanisms of fiscal policy are significantly affected by informality in the labour market. Extending a narrative database of fiscal consolidations in 14 countries from Latin America.

tries come from the Socio-Economic Database for Latin America and the Caribbean (CEDLAS and The World Bank). The informality rate of the economy corresponds to two definitions, a productive and a legal definition, and is obtained from each coun-try’s household surveys. Data on commodity prices and demand come from Gruss and Kebhaj (). Fiscal Consolidations and Informality in Latin America and the Caribbean. Thibault Lemaire (). Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) from HAL Abstract: The transmission mechanisms of fiscal policy are significantly affected by informality in the labour market. Extending a narrative database of fiscal consolidations in 14 countries from Latin America and the. The transmission mechanisms of fiscal policy are significantly affected by informality in the labour market. Extending a narrative database of fiscal consolidations in 14 countries from Latin America and the Caribbean between and in order to account for heterogeneity in terms of commitment to the reforms, I show that tax-based and spending-based multipliers are both recessionary and. The transmission mechanisms of fiscal policy are significantly affected by informality in the labour market. Extending a narrative database of fiscal consolidations in 14 countries from Latin America and the Caribbean between and in order to account for heterogeneity in terms of commitment to the reforms, this paper shows that tax-based and spending-based multipliers are both.

Although the study focuses on Latin America, its analysis, approach, and conclusions are relevant for all developing countries. Informality: Exit and Exclusion will be of value to professionals and academics studying labor market, social protection, tax, microenterprise development, and urban public policies, and to those working in government.   Informality is the norm for many in Latin America. On average, close to 60% of workers are considered informal, with particular incidence across most disadvantaged socioeconomic groups (OECD, a). In fact, 58% of informal workers live either in economic vulnerability (with USD a day) or in poverty (with less than USD a day) (Figure 1). Labor Informality in Latin America and the Caribbean: Patterns and Trends From Household Survey Microdata Article (PDF Available) in Desarrollo y sociedad 63() January with Reads.   Labour Overview. Latin America and the Caribbean. This report demonstrates that Latin America and the Caribbean have made progress in improving some key labour market indicators, especially in reducing unemployment, but significant gaps persist that affect the most vulnerable populations, the rate of informality remains high and not all.